• Today in Tudor History

      

     

    2 May 1507-Martin Luther Celebrates His First Mass

     

     

    Today in Tudor History

     

     

    2 May 1517-John Lincoln was imprisoned in the Tower for being an instigator of the Evil May Day Riots.

     

    Today in Tudor History

     

     

    2 May 1536-Anne Boleyn was arrested for Adultery, Incest, Treason, Witchcraft and interrogated by the council.At two o'clock in the afternoon, she was escorted by barge to the Tower of London.

     

    Today in Tudor History

     

     

    "Master Kingston,shall I go to a dungeon?"

    'No, Madam you shall go into your lodging that you lay in at your coronation.' 

    'It is too good for me. Jesu, have mercy on me!' 

    and she kneeled down weeping a great pace, and in the same sorrow fell into a great laughing, and she hath done so many times since.

     

    source: The life and death of Anne Boleyn by Eric Ives

     

    Today in Tudor History

     

     

     

     

    2 May 1536-George Boleyn Viscount Rochford, was imprisoned in the Tower  accused of adultery and incest with his sister, the queen

     

    Today in Tudor History

     

     

    2 May 1536-Sir Henry Norris was imprisoned in the Tower on 2nd May 1536 accused of adultery with the queen

    Today in Tudor History

    2 May 1536-Letter from Chapuys to Charles V.

     

    Your Majesty will remember what I wrote about the beginning of last month, of the conversation I had with Cromwell about the divorce of this King from the Concubine. I have since heard the will of the Princess, by which, as I wrote, I meant to be guided, and which was that I should promote the matter, especially for the discharge of the conscience of the King her father, and that she did not care in the least if he had lawful heirs who would deprive her of the succession, nor for all the injuries done either to herself or to the Queen her mother, which, for the honor of God, she pardoned everyone most heartily. I accordingly used several means to promote the matter, both with Cromwell and with others, of which I have not hitherto written, awaiting some certain issue of the affair, which, in my opinion, has come to pass much better than anybody could have believed, to the great disgrace [of the Concubine], who by the judgment of God has been brought in full daylight from Greenwich to the Tower of London, conducted by the duke of Norfolk, the two Chamberlains, of the realm and of the chamber, and only four women have been left to her. The report is that it is for adultery, in which she has long continued, with a player on the spinnet of her chamber, who has been this morning lodged in the Tower, and Mr. Norris, the most private and familiar "somelier de corps" of the King, for not having revealed the matter.

    The Concubine's brother, named Rochefort, has also been lodged in the Tower, but more than six hours after the others, and three or four before his sister; and even if the said crime of adultery had not been discovered, this King, as I have been for some days informed by good authority, had determined to abandon her; for there were witnesses testifying that a marriage passed nine years before had been made and fully consummated between her and the earl of Northumberland, and the King would have declared himself earlier, but that some one of his Council gave him to understand that he could not separate from the Concubine without tacitly confirming, not only the first marriage, but also, what he most fears, the authority of the Pope. These news are indeed new, but it is still more wonderful to think of the sudden' change from yesterday to today, and the manner of the departure from Greenwich to come hither; but I forbear particulars, not to delay the bearer, by whom you will be amply informed.

    As to the matters of France, I think they are in no great favor here. The French ambassador had a courier on Saturday; nevertheless, either for pride or disdain, he let himself be sent for twice before he would go to Court, from which he returned not over well pleased. The English had despatched a courier to France eight days ago, but they sent in great haste to recall him, and I have not heard that they have sent any one since. London, 2 May, Eve of the Invention of Holy Cross, 1536.

     

    source:http://www.british-history.ac.uk/

     

    Today in Tudor History

     

     

    2 May-1550 - Joan Bocher burned at the stake for heresy

    Joan Bocher was an English Anabaptist. She has also been known as Joan Boucher or Butcher, or as Joan Knell or Joan of Kent.

    Today in Tudor History

    2 May 1551- Birth of William Camden.He was an English antiquarian, historian, topographer, and officer of arms. He wrote the first chorographical survey of the islands of Great Britain and Ireland and the first detailed historical account of the reign of Elizabeth I of England.

    Today in Tudor History

    2 May 1559-John Knox returned to Scotland from exile to start the Scottish Reformation.

    Today in Tudor History

    2 May 1568-Mary Queen of Scots escaped from Lochleven Castle, where she had been imprisoned for ten months after being arrested and deposed from the Crown by members of the Scottish nobility.

    Today in Tudor History

    More history:

     

    2 May 1194 - King Richard I of England gives Portsmouth its first Royal Charter.

     

    2 May 1451 - Birth of René II, Duke of Lorraine 

    Today in Tudor History

    2 May 1519-Death of Leonardo da Vinci

    Today in Tudor History

    2 May 1598 - Henry IV signs Treaty of Vervins, ending Spain's interference in France.

     

    2 May 1611-First Publication of King James Bible in London

     

    source:wikipedia,http://www.mylifeatthetoweroflondon.com/,http://www.kamglobal.org/,http://www.lookandlearn.com/,pinterest,http://skepticism.org/,http://www.british-history.ac.uk/,http://www.maryqueenofscots.net/,The life and death of Anne Boleyn by Eric Ives

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