• Today in Tudor History...

    May your New Year be a New Year that brings luck,love and prosperity, a New Year that brings happiness and joy. Happy New Year! 

     

    Today in Tudor History...

     

     

     

     

     

    1st January 1431 – Birth of Pope Alexander VI

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    1438 – Albert II of Habsburg is crowned King of Hungary.

     

    1449 – Birth of Lorenzo de' Medici.He was an Italian statesman and de facto ruler of the Florentine Republic during the Italian Renaissance.Known as Lorenzo the Magnificent (Lorenzo il Magnifico) by contemporary Florentines, he was a magnate, diplomat, politician and patron of scholars, artists, and poets. He is perhaps best known for his contribution to the art world, sponsoring artists such as Botticelli and Michelangelo. His life coincided with the mature phase of Italian Renaissance and his death coincided with the end of the Golden Age of Florence.The fragile peace he helped maintain between the various Italian states collapsed with his death. Lorenzo de' Medici is buried in the Medici Chapel in Florence.

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    1504 - King Louis XII loses last bulwark in Naples, Caeta

     

    1511 – Birth of Henry, Duke of Cornwall . He was born on 1 January 1511 at Richmond Palace, eighteen months after his parents' wedding and coronation, and was the first son and first living child born to King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon. Catherine had previously given birth to a stillborn daughter, on 31 January 1510. He was christened on 5 January in a lavish ceremony where beacons were lit in his honour. The christening gifts included a fine gold salt holder and cup weighing a total 99 ounces, given by Louis XII of France, his godfather.His other godparents were William Warham, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Margaret of Austria, Duchess of Savoy. At the christening, the baby prince's great-aunt Lady Anne Howard stood proxy for Margaret of Habsburg, and Richard Foxe Bishop of Winchester stood proxy for the French King.

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    1514 – Death of Louis XII of France,husband of Mary Tudor and father of Claude,queen of France.He was a monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France from 1498 to 1515 and King of Naples from 1501 to 1504. The son of Charles, Duke of Orléans, and Maria of Cleves, he succeeded his cousin Charles VIII, who died without a closer heir in 1498.Louis was proclaimed "Father of the People" (French: Le Père du Peuple) in 1506 by the Estates-General of Tours for his reduction of the tax known as taille, legal reforms, and civil peace within France.He was married to Joan of France and Anne, Duchess of Brittany

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    1515 – King François I of France succeeds to the French throne.

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    1519-Henry VIII to Wolsey

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    "Myne awne good Cardinall, I recommande me unto yow as hartely as hart can thynke. So it is that by cause wryttyng to me is somewhat tedius and paynefull, therfor the most part off thes bysynesses I have commyttyd to our trusty counseler thys berrer, to be declaryd to yow by mowthe, to whyche we wollde yow shulde gyff credens. Nevertheles to thys that folowith I thowght nott best to make hym pryve, nor nonother but yow and I, whyche is that I wolde yow shuld make good watche on the duke off Suffolke, on the duke of Bukyngam, on my lord off Northe Omberland, on my lord off Darby, on my lord off Wylshere and on others whyche yow thynke suspecte, to see what they do with thes nwes. No more to yow at thys tyme, but sapienti pauca. Wryttyne with the hand off your lovyng master. Henry R."

     

    1524-.Anne Boleyn to Sir Thomas Boleyn

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    "Monssr. Je antandue par v[ost]re lettre que a ves envy que touss onette fame quan Je vindre a la courte et mavertisses que la Rene prendra la pein de de visser a vecc moy de quoy me Regoy bine fort de penser parler a vecc vng perscone tante sage et onnetecela me ferra a voyr plus grante anuy de continuer a parler bene franssais et oussy espel especy ale man pour suc que mellaues tant Recammande et de me man vous a versty que les gardere le meux que Je poure Monssr Je vous suppllya descusser sy ma lettre et male et sipta  car je vous asure quete et ottografie de monantend amant sule la (vne les auttres ne sont faiz  que escript de maman et Semmonet me dit la lettre mes domeura fan je le fie moy meme de peur que lone ne saces sance que Je vous mande et Je vous pry que le loumire de vu  vue net libertte de separe la voullante que dites aves de me edere car hile me samble quettes ascure on lue la ou vous poues sy vous plet me vere de clarasion de v[ost]re paroile et de moy coues sertene que miara cuoffice de peres ne din gratitude que sut en passer ne et fasere mon a veccsion quecte de libere deviere autont sance que vous plera me commander et vous prommes que mon amour et vondue par vng sy grant fermette quele nara James pouer de sane deminuer et feres fin a mon pourpon a pres mettre Recommande bine humblemente a v[ost]re bone grace et scripte a Veure de

    V[ost]re tres humble et tres obeiss 

    fille Anna de Boullan."

     

    "Sir, I understand by your letter that you desire that I shall be a worthy woman when I come to the Court and you inform me that the Queen will take the trouble to converse with me, which rejoices me much to think of talking with a person so wise and worthy. This will make me have greater desire to continue speaking French well and also spell, especially because you have enjoined it on me, and with my own hand I inform you that I will observe it the best I can. Sir, I beg you to excuse me if my letter is badly written, for I assure you that the orthography is from my own understanding alone, while the others were only written by my hand, and Semmonet tells me he letter but waits so that I may do it myself…Written at Veure by Your very humble and very obedient daughter, Anna de Boullan."

     

    1531-Chapuys to Charles V.

    I wrote yesterday. Today I received yours of the 5th and 12th ult., of which I informed the Queen, who will write to your Majesty. I could not have better intelligence with the Nuncio than I have had hitherto, and your Majesty's letter will incite him to persevere. The death of Madame (Margaret) is regretted by those who have intercourse with Flanders. I am told the king of England said it was no great loss for the world. He delights in everything that is to the disadvantage of your Majesty; but these are not things to take notice of, for the blindness of his miserable amour makes him talk indiscreetly. One reason why he is glad of Madame's death is because she took great interest in the Queen's matter, and also because she was the real means of concluding the amity with France. One of the things which made the King and his Council enquire of me most particularly was, when any one came from France to the said Lady, to know what was doing. By order of the Council of Malines, I sent a messenger to the duke of Norfolk to inform the King of her death, to which I only received a reply that the King knew it already. The Duke inquired of my messenger if it was true your Majesty was coming in post to Flanders, and if the Turks had raised the siege of Buda, and, thirdly, in what place you had received the French ransom. The messenger replied, that as to the first he did not know; that the second was not true, and it was said Buda had been taken, and that the Vayvode had retreated to a castle which was already offering to treat. (At this Norfolk seemed surprised and not well pleased.) As to the third, that the ransom was paid at Medina del Campo. The Duke would affirm that the Spaniards would not let it go out of the country : to which my messenger replied that Spain had already lent the Emperor a large sum of money, and had offered to keep it for him safely with the ransom where the Emperor pleased. At this the Duke remained pensive and silent.

    Some time ago the Queen told me that what displeases them most here is when they see I don't trouble myself much to make court to them; and she has sent to me today desiring that unless there be something urgent to speak to the King about, I should not visit him; for which reason I have abstained during these holidays. London, 1 Jan. 1531.

    P.S.I have just heard from a well-informed man that this marriage will undoubtedly be accomplished in this Parliament, and that they expect easily to pacify your Majesty. I cannot tell upon what they rest this expectation, as I have always told them distinctly the opposite, and shall do still before the game is concluded.

    The lady feels assured of it. She is braver than a lion. She said to one of the Queen's ladies that she wished all the Spaniards in the world were in the sea; and on the other replying, that, for the honor of the Queen, she should not say so, she said that she did not care anything for the Queen, and would rather see her hanged than acknowledge her as her mistress.

    The King is to be at the Tower on the day after Epiphany to examine the ordnance (munition), in order to inspire fear both in Englishmen and strangers. People are somewhat glad here of your Majesty's coming to Flanders, hoping that the King may have an interview with you, and that he might be able to obtain from you what his ambassador could not obtain at Bologna; but their satisfaction is not so great as their fear of the injury that you may do them, being so near; and, as I wrote to your Majesty, if you would examine the fortifications in Flanders and on the frontiers, it would encourage good men, and make bad men fear.

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    1535-Chapuys to Charles V.

    There is little to write, but as a messenger is going, must mention that, as no reply has come from the Emperor, and Darcy had not yet been able to get leave to retire to his country, Chapuys had refrained (je me suis deppousché) from sending to him, considering the danger of any intelligence between them being detected. Nor did Darcy send anyone to Chapuys till three days ago, when he sent a priest of his, who comes from Hainault, for news, saying that there was nothing he desired more than to speak with me when he should have got leave to retire to his country. He sent by the priest a handsome sword as a present, which I fancy was to indicate indirectly that times were ripe "pour jouer des couteaulx." I am the more inclined to believe in a hidden meaning, because he had long before sent me a gold pensée, well enamelled, begging me to keep it. I doubt not he will be very glad to hear that the earl of Northumberland is not too well pleased either with the King or with his ministers, as the said Earl's physician informed me two days ago, declaring that his master had said the whole realm was so indignant at the oppressions and enormities now practised, that if the Emperor would make the smallest effort, the King would be ruined. The King's only hope was in the Turk, of whose strength those here shamefully boast. The Earl then began to enlarge on the arrogance and malice of the King's lady, saying that lately she had spoken such shameful words to the duke of Norfolk as one would not address to a dog, so that he was compelled to quit the chamber. In his indignation he declared himself to one to whom he did not generally show good-will, and uttered reproaches against the said Lady, of which the least was to call her "grande putain." In the evening there arrived from Scotland one who had been my servant. He was bringing letters from your Majesty's ambassador in Scotland, but they were taken from him at the frontier. He said he had seen the said ambassador embark for Flanders. The ambassador had been well received. He said also they were very angry at the French for refusing the marriage promised to the King. With the said man returned from Scotland a nuncio of the late Pope, who did not venture to go by sea, and was taken at the frontier. There is some talk that the King means to send into Scotland, I know not for what, "mais il ne fault qui ce soit matiere ou il faille esperit ne arest presque (parceque?) il est question que le Sr Vuillyam frere du duc de Norfforc est celluy que doit avoir la charge." The Princess has been informed that, by virtue of the statute lately passed, which has been made more severe against those who refuse to swear and acknowledge the second mar riage, after these holydays she must renounce her title and take the oath, and that on pain of her life she must not call herself Princess or her mother Queen, but that if ever she does she will be sent to the Tower. She will never change her purpose, nor the Queen either. The Council here, owing to what has been discovered in France touching the Zwinglian heresy, have prohibited a book printed here a year ago in English, which is full of the said heresy. I am told also that of late the Chancellor has caused 15 books of the New Testament in English to be burned. Booksellers have been forbidden to sell or keep a prognostication lately made in Flanders, which threatens the King with war and misfortune this year; and some of the leading men of the Council have said that, matters being as they are, nothing is wanted to set the realm topsy turvy but to translate and publish the said prognostication in English. The Governor and Burgomaster of Belguez (Berghes) have come with a good company to treat, as it is said, in anticipation of the "festes" which are held at Belguez. I am told the King and Council care little about their coming, giving the people to understand that they have come for fear the English take other measures, and that they would not obey the Emperor if he forbade intercourse. I am told a kinsman of Kildare made overtures to deliver him to the King's men; and Kildare, being informed of it, gave such a banquet to those who watched him as they intended to give him,—took 500 or 600 of them along with his said kinsman, and sent them to execution. I am inclined to think this true, because of late Cromwell has several times said that before many days the said Kildare would be brought hither prisoner. London, 1 Jan. 1535.

     

    1537 – Marriage of James V of Scotland and Madeleine de Valois

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    1540 – Meeting of Henry VIII and Anne of Cleves at Rochester

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    1556 – Nicholas Heath  became Mary I’s Lord Chancellor

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    1559 – Death of Christian III of Denmark 

     

     

    source:wikipedia,http://www.historyorb.com/,http://onthetudortrail.com/,http://www.british-history.ac.uk/
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